Sujit Choudhry and His Contributions in Comparative Law

Comparative law, in its strict sense, is a theoretical study about legal networks by comparing each of the legal systems in place. The comparative law existed in the 19th century after many decisions from different states that legal institutions deserved an aligned and a systematic approach, which would further legal processes, and bring unity and understanding among foreign cultures.
This has given birth to a lot of practical vitality of the rising globalization of world trade high up the sky. For instance, a business executive will be at an upper hand to evaluate the benefits, risks, and the appropriate responses he should use to tackle foreign contract and investment. This reason, therefore, marked the beginning of comparative law’s existence in 1920 at a French Institute in Lyon. The do or die law latter made its successful way in the USA and Germany in law schools to link them with big foreign industries. Its presence also catalyses the codification process within the European Union and harmonizing laws particularly when the existence of a million legal traditions is a reality.  Source:  en.wikipedia.org

 
The comparative law medium has also been the mediator in international law trade conflicts. This is evidenced by its nature of eradicating the nationalistic spirit that for several reasons, has to continue frustrating development of international laws. Like for example, one may engage in international trade without the knowledge of the particular national law that will evaluate and regulate their agreements, which usually to a large extent, depends on undecided factors including the federal court to decide on competence issues of a trade system. Hence the birth of comparative law to govern all the legal questions that seem outside a single state jurisdiction to initiate the existence such projects.

 

For further reference, click this important link  http://officialsujitchoudhry.com/press/

 

On the other hand, Sujit Choudhry is a worldwide recognized Professor of Law officially known as I. Michael Heyman, the former dean of Berkeley Law. Most of his research addresses methodological queries in constitutional transitional design to peaceful, democratic rule, and comparative constitutional laws. He is also the founder of the Constitutional Transition Centres, which is the first global university based centre generating and mobilizing knowledge that aids the construction of constitutional building. Despite being a consultant at the World Bank Institute, he has also contributed in constitutional transition as a foreign constitutional expert in Tunisia, Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and Nepal. Before joining Berkeley Law, he served as a professor at NYU, Scholl Chair, UOToronto schools of law.  Sujit Choudhry has a collection of over nine articles, reports, working papers and book chapters. He has also managed to edit Constitutional Ideas Migration (Cambridge,2006), Constitutional Making (Edward Elgar, forthcoming), Dilemmas of Solidarity, Constitution for Divided Societies (Oxford, 2008), Oxford handbooks specifically for Indian Constitution.

 

Have a peek on twitter.com to learn more about Choudhry.